Wednesday, October 20, 2010

Picturing God: Faces & Traces of the Divine

My dear photographer friends who excel at seeing the Divine in all things:

Loyola Press has rolled out a daily photo blog to which you should definitely subscribe and might want to contribute:

"Each day, we’ll share a picture that evokes the presence of the divine. Picturing God is informed by
Ignatian spirituality, but we welcome seekers from all walks of life to explore the inspiring and sometimes surprising ways of encountering God in the everyday."

Check out the site for more information and to see what has already been posted. I was thinking of sending in a picture of Eugene, but I don't want him to get overexposed in the media.

4 comments:

Barbara said...

My dear friend, I don't think the world is quite ready for Eugene. Thanks for the info on the site, I'll check it out.
Peace - Barb

Jim Siegel said...

Dear Meredith,

Thanks for the tip! I signed up to get the photos. By the way, as a Jewish guy educated by Xaverian Brothers, I was not familiar with the principles of Ignatian Spirituality, which I found on the site. I was fascinated how the ten elements (http://ignatianspirituality.com/what-is-ignatian-spirituality/10-elements-of-ignatian-spirituality/) were similar to tenets of Judaism that I hold dear:

“To do the good deed is to fill the world with God.”-- Martin Buber

“There are no coincidences. Throughout all Creation, just beneath the surface, joining every person to every other person and to every other thing in a luminous organism of sacred responsibility, we discover invisible lines of connection." -- Rabbi Larry Kushner, Invisible Lines of Connection -- Sacred Stories of the Ordinary

“(We have) meager knowledge of the causes and effects of this world. Something infinite flows into a deed of a man; something infinite flows from it. The doer cannot apprehend who the powers are whose emissary and acting agent he is; he must nevertheless be aware that the fullness of the world’s destiny, namelessly interwoven, passes through his hands.” – Martin Buber

“There is no act that is trivial, and no good act is wasted. Every deed that you can do can have enormous impact for good and bad. Keep that in mind when you act next.” – Rabbi Irving Greenberg

“Creation, we are taught, is not an act that happened once upon a time, once and forever. The act of bringing the world into existence is a continuous process…Every instant is an act of creation.” – Abraham Joshua Heschel, The Sabbath

“This very powerful God needs us to be a partner in the unfolding, incomplete pieces of creation. We are not, therefore, insignificant specks in the cosmos. We are nobility. President John F. Kennedy unwittingly paraphrased Jewish theology when he suggested in his 1961 inaugural address that ‘God’s work on earth must truly be our own.’…It is more accurate to say that we are God’s junior partners. This means that we live in covenant with God and that God is interested in us and invested in our existence, just as we are invested in God’s existence. Our dilemma and our goal is to assure that our partnership with God brings nobility to our work, purpose to our livelihood and deep satisfaction to our labors.” -- Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, Being God’s Partner

“The teaching of Judaism is the theology of the common deed. The Bible insists that God is concerned with everydayness, with the trivialities of life. The great challenge does not lie in organizing solemn demonstrations, but in how we manage the commonplace.” -- Abraham Joshua Heschel

And you're right that Eugene needs some quiet time right now.

Best,
Jim

Jim Siegel said...

Dear Meredith,

Thanks for the tip! I signed up to get the photos. You’re right that Eugene needs his privacy right now.

As a Jewish guy educated by Xaverian Brothers, I was not familiar with the principles of Ignatian Spirituality, which I found on the site. I was fascinated how the ten elements (http://ignatianspirituality.com/what-is-ignatian-spirituality/10-elements-of-ignatian-spirituality/) were similar to tenets of Judaism:

“To do the good deed is to fill the world with God.”-- Martin Buber
“There are no coincidences. Throughout all Creation, just beneath the surface, joining every person to every other person and to every other thing in a luminous organism of sacred responsibility, we discover invisible lines of connection." -- Rabbi Larry Kushner, Invisible Lines of Connection -- Sacred Stories of the Ordinary
“(We have) meager knowledge of the causes and effects of this world. Something infinite flows into a deed of a man; something infinite flows from it. The doer cannot apprehend who the powers are whose emissary and acting agent he is; he must nevertheless be aware that the fullness of the world’s destiny, namelessly interwoven, passes through his hands.” – Martin Buber

“There is no act that is trivial, and no good act is wasted. Every deed that you can do can have enormous impact for good and bad. Keep that in mind when you act next.” – Rabbi Irving Greenberg


“Creation, we are taught, is not an act that happened once upon a time, once and forever. The act of bringing the world into existence is a continuous process…Every instant is an act of creation.” – Abraham Joshua Heschel, The Sabbath

“This very powerful God needs us to be a partner in the unfolding, incomplete pieces of creation. We are not, therefore, insignificant specks in the cosmos. We are nobility. President John F. Kennedy unwittingly paraphrased Jewish theology when he suggested in his 1961 inaugural address that ‘God’s work on earth must truly be our own.’…It is more accurate to say that we are God’s junior partners. This means that we live in covenant with God and that God is interested in us and invested in our existence, just as we are invested in God’s existence. Our dilemma and our goal is to assure that our partnership with God brings nobility to our work, purpose to our livelihood and deep satisfaction to our labors.” -- Rabbi Jeffrey Salkin, Being God’s Partner


“The teaching of Judaism is the theology of the common deed. The Bible insists that God is concerned with everydayness, with the trivialities of life. The great challenge does not lie in organizing solemn demonstrations, but in how we manage the commonplace.” -- Abraham Joshua Heschel

Best,
Jim

Denise said...

Thanks, Meredith, for sharing the word about Picturing God! I’m already being inspired by the submissions we're seeing. As for Eugene, I’ll leave it to you when he is ready for a wider debut. For now he probably needs the private rest after his near-dumpster experience. :)